MP Earl Dreeshen Announces New Role with International Trade Committee

September 19, 2017

Ottawa - Earl Dreeshen, Member of Parliament from Red Deer – Mountain View joins the House of Commons Standing Committee on International Trade (CIIT).

 

As a member of CIIT, Dreeshen will be at the forefront of studies and reports on international trade policy studying Canada’s economic relationship with other countries, trade agreements like the North American Free Trade Agreement, the effects of global competition on Canadian business and the Canadian economy, and the global trade and investment environment.

 

Dreeshen has previously served as a Canadian delegate to numerous international fora and trade missions with the previous Conservative Government under the Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper, and in his work with the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. Dreeshen also took part in international diplomatic assemblies in Paris, Washington, Germany, and Belgium in his previous role as Vice Chair of the Industry committee. Furthermore, Dreeshen will lend the committee his expertise in the agricultural sector as a dedicated agriculture advocate and farmer.

 

In his new role, Dreeshen will work alongside Opposition Critic for Trade, MP Dean Allison and Canada-US Relations Critic MP Collin Carrie.

 

“I am very honoured and eager to join CIIT, considering the importance of our work on the current negotiations with NAFTA and other international trade negotiations” said Dreeshen. “Canada needs to maintain a successful trading relationship between us and our closest allies; the Liberal Government should build on the hard work and success from the previous Conservative Government.” 

 

Dreeshen looks forward to the trade discussions and negotiations as they continue in Canada and across the world in the coming months. “Our main goal, as Opposition Members in this Committee, is to keep the Liberal Government accountable, and make sure that Canada maintains its competitive advantage as we navigate through the discussions and negotiations with NAFTA, soft wood lumber, and other multilateral free-trade deals” said Dreeshen. “We need to deliver a good deal for Canadians.”